Round Cuts

us-beef-cuts-banner

US_beef_map-round

Round Cuts

The large round primal cut weighs between 80 and 100 pounds (36-45 kg) and accounts for approximately 20% of the carcass. It is typically broken down into three sub primal cuts, the top round, the bottom round (gooseneck) and the knuckle. These cuts contain the several muscles that form the upper leg from the thigh to the shin.  They are lean but tough and have significant connective tissue. As such, round roasts are best suited for moist heat, but some steaks can be broiled or grilled.

meat-cuts-divider

Bottom Round Roast & Steak

Bottom Round Roast & Steak

bottom-round-roast

Cooking Methods: 

Braise/Roast

Other Names: 

Bottom Round Pot Roast, Bottom Round Oven Roast, Round Roast, Rump Roast

Description:

Bottom round roasts and steaks are typically cut from the “flat”, a long muscle group that runs from the loin to the shank-end of the round. The flat is typically cut into three sections. The portion at the loin-end is called a rump roast. Steaks are usually cut from the center section. These cuts are economical, very lean, firm, and have a tendency to dry out if overcooked. Braising is really the only method for cooking a roast. Steaks can be pan-fried if sliced thin–½ to ¾ inches (1-2 cm), tenderized, and cooked to medium.

Eye of Round Roast & Steak

Eye of Round Roast & Steak

eye-of-round

Cooking Methods: 

Braise/Roast; Steaks–Braise/Broil/Grill/Pan Fry

Other Names: 

Round Eye Pot Roast

Description:

Lean and economical, the eye of round resembles the tenderloin but is much tougher.  Rich with beef flavor, it is often used for roast beef sandwiches; cooked to medium rare and sliced very thin. Steaks are generally an inch thick (2.5 cm), and can be grilled, pan-fried or braised. It’s best no to over cook them.

Knuckle Roast & Steak

Knuckle Roast & Steak

knuckle-roasts

Cooking Methods: 

Roasts–Roast; Steaks–Broil/Grill/Pan Fry

Other Names: 

Roasts–Ball Tip Roast, Crescent Roast, Face Round Roast, Round Tip Roast Sirloin Tip Roast, Tip Roast; Steaks–Ball Tip Steak, Breakfast Steak, Round Tip Steak, Sandwich Steak, Sirloin Cap Steak, Sirloin Tip Steak, Tip Steak

Description:

The bottom round knuckle is a ball-shaped group of muscles, the tip of which is attached to the sirloin. As such, roasts and steaks cut from the knuckle are commonly marketed as “sirloin tip”. (See also Ball Tip Roast and Steak under Sirloin Cuts for more.) While it is less tender than the sirloin, it is quite versatile The full roast weighs about 12 to 15 pounds (5-7 kg) and can be sold with a fat cap or without (peeled), but given it’s lean nature, the fat cap maybe preferred. For smaller portions, the knuckle can be cut lengthwise into two halves to form sirloin tip center and sirloin tip side roasts (not pictured). Steaks will vary in shape and size (4-16 ounces) depending on whether they’re cut from the full sirloin tip or the smaller roasts. Cook roast in a slow oven, about 300-325°F (150–160°C), until medium rare. Steaks cook quickly and should be grilled or pan fried to medium rare as well.

knuckle-steaks

Top Round Roast & Steak

Top Round Roast & Steak

top-round

Cooking Method: 

Roasts–Roast; Steaks–Broil/Grill/Pan Fry

Other Names: 

London Broil, Short Cut, Top Round London Broil, Top Round Steak (Center Cut)

Description:

Top round roasts are more tender than those of the bottom round. Often the roast will be sliced thick for London Broil or pot roasts. Thick steaks are sold as “top round steaks”, and thin steaks as “round steaks”. Can also be cut into cubes for stewing or kabobs. Very thin slices of top round are commonly used for Japanese sukiyaki. Roasts and steaks are best cooked to medium rare. Roast larger pieces low and slow at 200° F (100° C) for several hours. Steaks can be grilled or broiled, but will benefit from marinating first, as they tend to dry out easily.